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i7 4930K Temperature monitoring
#1
Hi, I recently upgraded to a i7 4930K and am in the process of trying to monitor my temps in the hope of starting to overclock.  I am curious about which temperature to keep an eye on and what each one relates too. Currently I have 3 places that CPU temperature is mentioned

CPU [#0]: Intel Core i7-4930K: DTS: 
Individual core temps (Core 0-5)
Distance to TjMAX  
CPU Package
Core Max

CPU [#0]: Intel Core i7-4930K
Memory Ambient
CPU Package
PP0

ASUS P9X79 (Nuvoton NCT6776F)
MOtherboard
Auxiliary
SYSTIN 1-3
CPU

I did read on another thread that "Digital Thermal Sensors (DTS) are located at the heat sources where temperatures are highest" So I would assume that I should be keeping an eye on them temperatures , particularly the Core Max and CPU Package

For my old i7 3820 I just looked at  "Core Max" and "CPU Package" under the DTS heading, but on my i7 4930K the readings under the non DTS heading are a lot higher. 
For example just to check temps I applied a small 4.3GHz OC, the DTS readings for CPU Package and Core Max idle 40-42c peak at 74c while under the non DTS heading the CPU package and pp0 idle at 51-53c and peak as high as 85c. 74c under a stress test is one thing but going into the high 80s is concerning . 

I know different programs can take readings from different places but if it matters Corsair Link seems to be on par with the DTS readings 

Thanks.
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#2
Yes, I suggest to watch the DTS-related values, as these are kind of 'official' values.
The others seems to be using an offset against DTS on some systems, unfortunately Intel did never clarify why is this so.
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#3
OK thanks for the info, 

What does the PP0 relate too? As that and the "CPU Package"  under the non DTS are always the same value. 

Also is there a reading for the motherboard VRMs? I've read that on Ivy-Bridge-E overclocking VRMs can get quite hot and to make sure to monitor them as well. 
The 6 temperatures listed under my motherboard "ASUS P9X79 (Nuvoton NCT6776F)" are all fine, but none mention VRM so I just want to be sure. 

Also thanks for the help and good work with HWinfo, one of the first thing I get on a fresh install.
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#4
PP0 should be the part of CPU which covers the IA (x86) execution cores, so not the iGPU nor Uncore, etc.
VRM monitoring depends on mainboard design - whether it's capable to monitor it. This is usually achieved via a dedicated sensor on the VRM, or digital PWMs with such capability.
So if you don't see such a value in HWiNFO, your mainboard is not capable of monitoring VRM.
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#5
(09-06-2017, 02:41 PM)Martin Wrote: PP0 should be the part of CPU which covers the IA (x86) execution cores, so not the iGPU nor Uncore, etc.
VRM monitoring depends on mainboard design - whether it's capable to monitor it. This is usually achieved via a dedicated sensor on the VRM, or digital PWMs with such capability.
So if you don't see such a value in HWiNFO, your mainboard is not capable of monitoring VRM.

Ok, work has a Laser thermometer, so might steal that for a day and use it to check the VRMs. As for the "PP0" and "CPU package" under the non DTS heading, they seem to be using the same sensor as the reading is identical.  You mention they might be using offset against the DTS should I still be worried about these temps if the DTS temps are in line, or is it safe to assume the DTS are the important ones and I could ignore the non DTS readings?
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#6
I believe the DTS ones should be important, as these are also values on which the internal thermal protection relies.
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#7
(09-06-2017, 03:56 PM)Martin Wrote: I believe the DTS ones should be important, as these are also values on which the internal thermal protection relies.

Thanks for the help and keep up the good work.
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