Alerts should be able to run CMD, VBS, and shortcut files

Currently, the "Run A Program" feature of Alerts can only execute EXE and the obsolete BAT files. It should support the newer CMD files, as well as other types of files such as VBS scripts. The black box that flashes over the screen could be prevented if the commands could be routed through a VBS file. It is possible to choose shortcuts, but the shortcut is not actually used, and instead the linked file is found and substituted. If shortcuts continued to be used (after a possible Yes/No question to substitute for the actual file), the properties of shortcuts would continue to apply, such as to run minimized.

I have an SSD in this laptop, and since it is an SSD instead of the proper spindle, it heats up to 78 C under load. When the SSD controller reaches 60 C, this proprietary software is set to execute <nbfc.exe set -f 0 -f 1 -s 80> to set the fans to 80%. Because it turns the fan up automatically, it would otherwise remain high, so it is also set to execute <nbfc.exe set -f 0 -f 1 -s 101> when the SSD flash comes back down to 40 C. (Since only one alert can be set per sensor, the flash temperature needs to be used for spinning down instead of the controller.) The problem is that the down threshold is triggered hundreds of times per day, flashing and interrupting text input, even when the fans were not set high a few minutes prior. If it was possible to run VBS files, there would not be flashing black boxes. Of course, shared memory could be used instead, but no programs that are compatible with the Acer Aspire A715-42G support the shared memory feature.
 

Martin

HWiNFO Author
Staff member
You can run VBS scripts via built-in cscript. Configure the alert to run "\Windows\System32\cscript.exe" with argument being the VBS file.
 

Dalai

Well-Known Member
You can run VBS scripts via built-in cscript. Configure the alert to run "\Windows\System32\cscript.exe" with argument being the VBS file.
I think you mean wscript.exe since cscript.exe is the command line script interpreter which would also cause window flashing.

@Callistemon:
When typing *.* into the File name field, the dialog allows selection of any file type. The File type drop down only contains pre-defined filters. I guess HWiNFO tells the OS to run the file, so it shouldn't matter which type it is as long as it's executable.

Apart from VBS, there are more options to run programs while avoiding such window flashing: AutoIt, AutoHotkey, NirCmd, just to name a few.

HTH

Regards
Dalai
 

Dalai

Well-Known Member
Is there a command line for configuring the sensor settings?
What do you mean? What do you want to configure? Most of HWiNFO's settings are saved in the registry, HKCU\Software\HWiNFO64 (or HWiNFO32), and those independent from hardware are saved in HWiNFO64.ini (or HWiNFO32.ini) in the HWiNFO directory.

Regards
Dalai
 

Dalai

Well-Known Member
Identifying sensors by name alone is ambiguous since there often are sensors with the same name but under different headings. On my system I have "CPU" under my CPU heading (Ryzen 5 2600 Enhanced) and under the motherboard (ASUS Prime X370-A). And there's another sensor named "CPU" under the same motherboard heading, but this time for the CPU fan.

And, even if you happen to have sensors with a unique name, I somewhat doubt the benefit because such script would be hardware specific. Sure, if you have dozens of systems with the same hardware, it could provide benefits. OTOH, you could set it up on one system and export the registry path I mentioned above (maybe reduce it to the things you want/need) and then import that on the other systems. The result is the same. Speaking of registry path: HWiNFO has a "Backup User Settings" button in the main settings dialog which exports this very key (AFAIK).

Regards
Dalai
 
In one example, the SSD has a "Drive Temperature" and sometimes also a "Drive Temperature 2" sensor. The "Drive Temperature" name also appears under external HDDs. The solution would be to specify the sensor with the name "Drive Temperature" and that is under HDD0, regardless of the display name or model of HDD0. In fact, the sensors list already tracks disks by HDD number (sometimes leading to displaying the wrong model after swapping, or comparing the current disk SMART attributes to the previous disk threshold).
 
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