HWInfo and FSB

Zach

Well-Known Member
Hi!
When you open HWiNFO choose the Sensors Only mode and it will open a window with all the sensors your system has.
There you will see a sensor next to CPU core speeds named "Bus Clock", or "Base Clock", or "Bus Speed" or something equivalent.

What is your system?
Depending your system this would be 100MHz, or 133MHz, or 200MHz if you havent done any overclocking to it.
 
Hi!
When you open HWiNFO choose the Sensors Only mode and it will open a window with all the sensors your system has.
There you will see a sensor next to CPU core speeds named "Bus Clock", or "Base Clock", or "Bus Speed" or something equivalent.

What is your system?
Depending your system this would be 100MHz, or 133MHz, or 200MHz if you havent done any overclocking to it.
It only shows 99.8 MHz. I wanted to see the full speed, that should be 667 MHz, as you can see below. I have Windows 7 x64.
 

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Dalai

Well-Known Member
The Bus Clock (usually 100 MHz) has nothing to do with the Memory Clock, in your case 667 MHz or 1333 MT/s or DDR3-1333.

I'm not sure why HWiNFO shows/reads 99.8 instead of 100 MHz, but I know it's been discussed in the past.

Regards
Dalai
 

Zach

Well-Known Member
As @Dalai said what you are looking for is different.
The FSB, called FrontSideBus on old systems, is the base clock of the system. The main bus clock.
If you are looking for RAM speed, then it’s something else.

Why don’t you tell us what exactly are you looking for, so we can help you.
You can describe as detailed as you like the reason that got you to look for speeds of your system.

PS:
You can click the blue arrows at the bottom left of sensors window to view more sensors at a time.
 

Dalai

Well-Known Member
Somehow I doubt that your CPU (Celeron 847) still has a (classic) FSB. Wikipedia states:
The original front-side bus architecture has been replaced by HyperTransport, Intel QuickPath Interconnect or Direct Media Interface in modern volume CPUs.
And according to the linked article QuickPath Interconnect was introduced more than a decade ago. According to Intel Ark, the Celeron 847 launched in 2011, and it doesn't say anything about FSB but generic "Bus Speed" instead.

However, I haven't been using Intel processors in... forever (the only one is in my laptop), so I don't know much about Intel's CPU architectures.

Regards
Dalai
 

Zach

Well-Known Member
Now I saw it...
That image is from 2005. Its Pentium4 and PentiumD era...
I think Pentium 4s and Ds was both maxed at 800MHz FSB
 
This is the manual of my mobo. (Sorry for it being portuguese. I didn't find any english version!)
 

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Zach

Well-Known Member
Your CPU is a mobile Celeron 847 from 2011. Why are looking for speeds based upon a picture from 2005 on completely different system?
 
Your CPU is a mobile Celeron 847 from 2011. Why are looking for speeds based upon a picture from 2005 on completely different system?
Man, i wanna know the MOTHER-BOARD CPU SOCKET BUS SPEED, not the processor bus speed. I wonder why it's so hard for you to understand that. If you don't understand my question, please, don't answer anymore. Thank you all for your help!
 

Martin

HWiNFO Author
Staff member
How your so-called "motherboard CPU socket bus speed" different from the CPU bus speed? It's the same thing.
 

Dalai

Well-Known Member
Yes, a motherboard can usually run different speeds for the FSB. But that doesn't mean that CPU FSB speed would be any different from the speed at the chipset side (Northbridge to be exact). When you change the FSB speed in a motherboard's BIOS, the CPU and Northbridge run at the same speed. It wouldn't make any sense to drive different speeds on both sides of the bus, because that wouldn't work properly. There is even a performance loss when running the memory at a different speed than the FSB, but that's a whole other story.

Newer CPU's - read, those not from more than a decade ago - have the Northbridge built-in, so there is no separate chip to make a separate bus to. Although technically there's still some kind of bus, but not an FSB, because everything happens right on the CPU substrate (if not the DIE itself).

I hope this makes it more clear.

Regards
Dalai
 

Martin

HWiNFO Author
Staff member
Check in the main HWiNFO window (not sensors) for more details about your CPU and bus.
 
Yes, a motherboard can usually run different speeds for the FSB. But that doesn't mean that CPU FSB speed would be any different from the speed at the chipset side (Northbridge to be exact). When you change the FSB speed in a motherboard's BIOS, the CPU and Northbridge run at the same speed. It wouldn't make any sense to drive different speeds on both sides of the bus, because that wouldn't work properly. There is even a performance loss when running the memory at a different speed than the FSB, but that's a whole other story.

Newer CPU's - read, those not from more than a decade ago - have the Northbridge built-in, so there is no separate chip to make a separate bus to. Although technically there's still some kind of bus, but not an FSB, because everything happens right on the CPU substrate (if not the DIE itself).

I hope this makes it more clear.

Regards
Dalai
Yeah, you helped a lot! I see that the multiplier makes all the difference. What i really wanted to know is the maximum speed of the northbridge alone. I still have to check some information about some details that HWInfo shows, as you can see in the print below, but it seems to me that the FSB of my mobo will be 800 MHz or 1.100 MHz, depending on the circuit you look at, right?Print 1.jpg
 
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