When HWInfo64 is going to have accurate reading for ryzen 3000

Martin

HWiNFO Author
Staff member
The CPU can reach the maximum clock only under certain conditions, there are several factors limiting this - number of cores utilized, temperature, power limits, etc.
Your CPU seems to indeed boost to 4.4 GHz, but only for short periods because of the above mentioned limits. You cannot expect the CPU to reach the maximum boost clock on all cores at once and for an indefinite period.
 

Zach

Well-Known Member
Same here...
The R5 3600 is a 4.2GHz max rated boost CPU and yet you only see a max 4.08GHz on effective clock. This is just browsing/watching videos (see pic below)
Its just how these chips work. The max rated boost is like a short burst.
When playing games the clock is mainly at 4.075~4.100MHz with short bursts at 4.125~4.175MHz. Max effective clock still just under 4.100MHz
Only when running something like CB R20 single core I saw effective clock for 2 cores at around ~4120MHz.

Remember that max rated boost is a single core/thread clock and today nothing really is a single threaded load on a modern system.

1575658646152.png
 
Same here...
The R5 3600 is a 4.2GHz max rated boost CPU and yet you only see a max 4.08GHz on effective clock. This is just browsing/watching videos (see pic below)
Its just how these chips work. The max rated boost is like a short burst.
When playing games the clock is mainly at 4.075~4.100MHz with short bursts at 4.125~4.175MHz. Max effective clock still just under 4.100MHz
Only when running something like CB R20 single core I saw effective clock for 2 cores at around ~4120MHz.

Remember that max rated boost is a single core/thread clock and today nothing really is a single threaded load on a modern system.

View attachment 3919

I see 4.2ghz on core 1 and core 2 clock.
 

PiersJH

Well-Known Member
I believe those people recommended Ryzen Master because AMD did so some time ago.
Integrating their SDK would be problematic as it would require shipping additional AMD DLLs and installing another AMD kernel driver. This adds complexity and can cause undesirable effects. There are also other aspects that I cannot disclose.
We don't know for sure what exactly RM reports as temperature, but most probably it's an average value of all core sensors across some (unknown) interval. Averaging is done in order to flatten potential spikes of instantenous high/low values. A similar technique is done in reporting of core voltages.
CPU (Tctl/Tdie) in HWiNFO should be the immediate hottest temperature in the entire CPU package, while the CCD value covers only the CPU cores of a given Core Complex Die (CCD). Based on our measurements, the CCD value should be closer to AMD Ryzen Master reported temperature.
In your opinion, would the Tjmax apply to Tctl/Tdie, CCD (whichever is hotter), or CPU package? It's hard to know which value to monitor to give a real idea of the general temperature of the CPU. Tctl/Tdie seems unrealistic as it includes brief spikes. I'm happy to be corrected if wrong.
 

Martin

HWiNFO Author
Staff member
Tctl/Tdie is the immediate value, while "CPU Die (average)" is the average value filtered with a time constant. In my opinion the maximum temperature is applied against the later one, but that's jus tmy personal opinion.
 

PiersJH

Well-Known Member
Tctl/Tdie is the immediate value, while "CPU Die (average)" is the average value filtered with a time constant. In my opinion the maximum temperature is applied against the later one, but that's jus tmy personal opinion.
Unless I misunderstand, I agree that it makes more sense to base CPU temperature on average rather than bursty values.
 
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