Unknown reason for system crashing

Since upgrading the CPU, motherboard and RAM in my desktop PC I have been experiencing multiple system crashes, as though there has been a complete power cut. I originally posted on the LinusTechTips forum for some help and someone suggested running HWiNFO on my desktop to see if there is any unusual activity in any of the components at the time of my computer cutting out, but I have no idea what unusual behaviour I'm looking for.

Can anyone on this forum help me determine if there's an issue in my hardware from this report? I'm unable to upload the file on this forum but you can download it on LTT instead. Additionally when watching HWiNFO running and getting real time statistics I noticed Power Reporting Deviation (Accuracy) under the CPU [#0]: AMD Ryzen 7 3800X: Enhanced heading in red, is this unusual?

If you would like more information about the problem and/or the hardware I'm using I've detailed more information on LTT forum.

Thanks in advance for any help.
 

Attachments

  • HWiNFO Power Report.PNG
    HWiNFO Power Report.PNG
    62 KB · Views: 6

Zach

Well-Known Member
PowerReportingDeviation(accuracy) probably has nothing to do with your crashes.
PRD only makes sense when CPU is on 100% full load. Otherwise do not pay attention to it, even if it’s red. Only when 100% loaded and red, then you should be concerned.

I would suggest to:
1. Update the board bios to the latest.
2. Update chipset drivers to the latest (only from AMD download drivers site)
3. Update Win10 to the latest v2004 if available.

If you don’t see any improvement:

4. Disable XMP profile in BIOS and set speed (3200MHz or mem multi x32) and DRAM voltage manually (1.35V)
5. Set primary timings manually.

Can you show a screenshot of ZenTimings software now with XMP profile on?

I have X570 AorusPro and the BIOS must be exactly the same, so I can guide you through it if needed.
 
PowerReportingDeviation(accuracy) probably has nothing to do with your crashes.
PRD only makes sense when CPU is on 100% full load. Otherwise do not pay attention to it, even if it’s red. Only when 100% loaded and red, then you should be concerned.

I would suggest to:
1. Update the board bios to the latest.
2. Update chipset drivers to the latest (only from AMD download drivers site)
3. Update Win10 to the latest v2004 if available.

If you don’t see any improvement:

4. Disable XMP profile in BIOS and set speed (3200MHz or mem multi x32) and DRAM voltage manually (1.35V)
5. Set primary timings manually.

Can you show a screenshot of ZenTimings software now with XMP profile on?

I have X570 AorusPro and the BIOS must be exactly the same, so I can guide you through it if needed.
Thanks Zach! I'm not currently at home and won't be now until the day after tomorrow but I will go through some of those steps to see if anything changes.

I've never updated the bios of a motherboard before, is it difficult or risky at all?
Also I don't fully understand step 4 and 5 so I may need some help when I get to those stages.
 

Zach

Well-Known Member
No problem...
I can (try at least to) explain anything as simple as possible from my end. And please read all I'm writing carefully before doing anything.
First of, at least 1st and 2nd must be done. And why not the 3rd. And I will add a 4th(must) and make the other two 5/6. The reason for 1~4, is because there is a great possibility that latest versions of all can improve stability by alot.
The 5/6 is for the case that the combo of CPU's memory controller + Mainboard + DRAM sticks are not 100% compatible all together and by enabling the XMP profile of DRAM (so that can run on 3200MHz) it (may) causes errors.

1. Update the board bios to the latest.
2. Update B550 chipset drivers to the latest (only from AMD download drivers site) (v2.10.13.408 as uptodate)
3. Update Win10 to the latest v2004 if available.
4. Update GPU drivers (RX5700) to the latest official (WHQL v20.9.1 as uptodate)


Chipset and GPU drivers:
Dont use the AutoDetect software. Select them from list down further.

If you don’t see any improvement:

5. Disable XMP profile in BIOS and set speed (3200MHz or mem multi x32) and DRAM voltage manually (1.35V)
6. Set primary timings manually.


-----------------------------------------------
For now we can leave 5/6.

BIOS update as a procedure is really easy today, because every vendor includes a BIOS flashing/update utility integrated into the BIOS itself. Gigabyte calls it Q-Flash and you can enter this utility by hitting "F8" key after you enter the BIOS with "Del" key.
All vendors also provide a Windows utility to update BIOS but I would strongly avoid it, as through windows a lot more can go wrong and especially on a system that already is unstable.

Updating BIOS always has some risk on it. A lot can go wrong, from power loss (from home power grid) to any kind of glitch during the flashing/update that takes about 3~5min. If anything goes wrong during the update it could "just" mess with it, make it unstable, up to completely "brick" it and render it nonFunctional.
Worry not though! Today most of mainboards, including yours, have a little button onboard that can flash the BIOS again in any state that can be. Functional or not. You can see it on the back I/O plate named as "Q-Flash Plus" next to the white colored USB port.
I'll get back to it with more details, for not making this post too long.

So before doing anything, lets see that ZenTimings screenshot. It shows some general info of the system, current BIOS version, and some detailed info for DRAM settings.

1604043859954.png
 
Last edited:
No problem...
I can (try at least to) explain anything as simple as possible from my end. And please read all I'm writing carefully before doing anything.
First of, at least 1st and 2nd must be done. And why not the 3rd. And I will add a 4th(must) and make the other two 5/6. The reason for 1~4, is because there is a great possibility that latest versions of all can improve stability by alot.
The 5/6 is for the case that the combo of CPU's memory controller + Mainboard + DRAM sticks are not 100% compatible all together and by enabling the XMP profile of DRAM (so that can run on 3200MHz) it (may) causes errors.

1. Update the board bios to the latest.
2. Update B550 chipset drivers to the latest (only from AMD download drivers site) (v2.10.13.408 as uptodate)
3. Update Win10 to the latest v2004 if available.
4. Update GPU drivers (RX5700) to the latest official (WHQL v20.9.1 as uptodate)


Chipset and GPU drivers:
Dont use the AutoDetect software. Select them from list down further.

If you don’t see any improvement:

5. Disable XMP profile in BIOS and set speed (3200MHz or mem multi x32) and DRAM voltage manually (1.35V)
6. Set primary timings manually.


-----------------------------------------------
For now we can leave 5/6.

BIOS update as a procedure is really easy today, because every vendor includes a BIOS flashing/update utility integrated into the BIOS itself. Gigabyte calls it Q-Flash and you can enter this utility by hitting "F8" key after you enter the BIOS with "Del" key.
All vendors also provide a Windows utility to update BIOS but I would strongly avoid it, as through windows a lot more can go wrong and especially on a system that already is unstable.

Updating BIOS always has some risk on it. A lot can go wrong, from power loss (from home power grid) to any kind of glitch during the flashing/update that takes about 3~5min. If anything goes wrong during the update it could "just" mess with it, make it unstable, up to completely "brick" it and render it nonFunctional.
Worry not though! Today most of mainboards, including yours, have a little button onboard that can flash the BIOS again in any state that can be. Functional or not. You can see it on the back I/O plate named as "Q-Flash Plus" next to the white colored USB port.
I'll get back to it with more details, for not making this post too long.

So before doing anything, lets see that ZenTimings screenshot. It shows some general info of the system, current BIOS version, and some detailed info for DRAM settings.

View attachment 5376
Hi Zach, sorry for the late reply.

I just want to pick your brain about updating the BIOS version on my motherboard before I try anything in the BIOS. I looked on the Gigabyte motherboard support page and I'm a little confused by the 'Description' column. The description reads '1. Update AMD AGESA ComboV2 1.1.0.0 C for performance optimized on Ryzen 5000 series processors'. Is that an instruction for me to update something else before I install the new BIOS firmware update v F11d or just a comment about the update?
 

Zach

Well-Known Member
Hi Zach, sorry for the late reply.

I just want to pick your brain about updating the BIOS version on my motherboard before I try anything in the BIOS. I looked on the Gigabyte motherboard support page and I'm a little confused by the 'Description' column. The description reads '1. Update AMD AGESA ComboV2 1.1.0.0 C for performance optimized on Ryzen 5000 series processors'. Is that an instruction for me to update something else before I install the new BIOS firmware update v F11d or just a comment about the update?
Its just a description of the version. What new feature/fixes has. No need to do anything else first.
Whats the current version your board has?
Any screenshot of ZenTimings available? I would like to see the whole picture of DRAM settings on it...
 
Last edited:
Okay great, so just flash it like all other BIOS updates? The current version is F1 so the very first BIOS version of the motherboard.
Here's also a screenshot of ZenTimings.
 

Attachments

  • ZenTimings_Screenshot.png
    ZenTimings_Screenshot.png
    38.2 KB · Views: 6

Zach

Well-Known Member
Yeah... The very first release is almost always not stable. At least for 500series boards.
Know that when a BIOS file name is having a letter at the end (ex F11d) its a beta version. This can be replaced in a few days/weeks with the F11e/f and so on... until final version (F11)
All others are final versions (F1/2/3/4/10). There was a time when I was updating to anything new, beta of final. But now only to a final version.
Its better to play safe and try the F10 file. The F11d only makes board compatible with the latest 5000series CPUs.

Extract the downloaded compressed file to place on you drive(s) and take the 3 files (except readme file) to a usb drive on FAT32.
With that you can enter BIOS utility (Q-Flash) with F8 key from inside BIOS. Select "UpdateBIOS", choose the BIOS file, click the "play" button and the utility will verify the file. Then you can update it.
Takes 3~5 min. After finish updating it will reboot and prompt you to enter BIOS again.

Know that all settings will be back to default and must be reconfigured as you had them. You cant use a saved profile settings from previous BIOS version. Any BIOS settings profile saved within BIOS profile slots will be erased after updating. And even if you could access them they're not compatible.

As a failsafe option you can take a second same BIOS file, rename it to gigabyte.bin and place it on the usb drive. This can be used to flash BIOS if needed outside BIOS utility and with PC turned off (PSU On) with the aid of "Q-Flash Plus" button as long as your usb flash drive is plugged to the white port.
 
Last edited:
Hey @Zach I'm sorry it's been like two weeks since we last spoke. Before updating the BIOS I wanted to check in with the retailer who I bought the motherboard first, didn't want to void my warranty first. I ended up sending my motherboard back and they sent me a replacement, frustratingly with the same BIOS version, F1. Since it arrived yesterday I have rebuilt my PC and have already had the same issue happen 3 times but it's slightly different now, it only seems to completely cut out when my PC has gone to sleep, either automatically or manually, and has cut out when I wake it back up. Just before the screen lights up and I get the login screen it just powers off without warning. I haven't experienced it cut out yet from just using it, only from waking it back up so far. Is this still likely to just be a BIOS firmware issue? I think rather than contacting the supplier again I'm going to try a BIOS update myself but I just wanted to get your thoughts first. I hope you're well by the way! Cheers
 

Zach

Well-Known Member
Hey, no worries! Welcome back...
I'm fine and hoping the same for you.

Related or not to the "new" issue, the very first BIOS of any board 99.9% is unstable. You should flash the latest. Just as you must download latest chipset drivers from AMD.
I never had experienced this "wake up" shutdown because I never use sleep/hibernation modes for the last 18years. Always find those modes to be finicky and causing various of issues.

Just follow post 8.
 
Thanks @Zach for your help. I've now flashed BIOS version F10 and it hasn't crashed when I put my computer to sleep and woke it back up again. Hopefully the issue has been resolved now but I will find out over the next couple days. Helpful to know about the sleep/hibernation modes.
 
If you don’t see any improvement:

5. Disable XMP profile in BIOS and set speed (3200MHz or mem multi x32) and DRAM voltage manually (1.35V)
6. Set primary timings manually.
Hello again @Zach. Frustratingly the issue still persists. I successfully updated the BIOS and I have tried disabling and enabling XMP Profile 1. I imagine this leaves us with steps 5 and 6 in your previous post? At this point is this likely to be an issue with my CPU if anything as I have tried two motherboards, two PSU's, multiple clean installs of Windows 10 on two different drives, two separate pairs of 16GB DDR4 memory modules and various software/firmware tweaks? I just want my PC to work normally :(
I noticed that I can quite consistently replicate the crashing now by running Cinebench R23. If I set it to run the 10 minute multicore stress test it normally crashes a couple of minutes in. So I have tried different configurations and each time it has crashed except on one occasion which I presume was a anomaly as it crashed the following day without any hardware or software changes. Additionally it hasn't crashed just from regular use now but when I stress it out with Cinebench, that might just be an observation from lack of use though.
I really appreciate your help!
 

Zach

Well-Known Member
It is very likely that the specific boards with the specific CPU to require some manual settings about DRAM configuration.
Those two separate pairs of 16GB (2x8)sticks was the same or different?

Can I see a screenshot of ZenTimings?
Also, have you seen at all the Windows Event Viewer for identifying any errors on the exact time of issue?
 
Last edited:
Hmm okay, I have the option to return the CPU if you think that might help?

They RAM sticks are the same brand and model, here's a link. I have two sets which in total makes 4x8GB. I've tried both sets separately and together in the correct DIMM slots as specified in the manual. The ZenTimings screenshot in a previous thread was the first set and now I'm running the second set separately as I was trying to figure out whether the first set were causing the instability issues.

I didn't know Windows Event Viewer was even a thing but I've just opened it up and found a 'Critical' level error at the time when my PC crashed earlier today (screenshot attached). The last few critical error crashes have the error code '0x8000400000000002' and after having a very quick Google search revealed a similar issue someone else was facing.
 

Attachments

  • ZenTimings_Screenshot.png
    ZenTimings_Screenshot.png
    37.8 KB · Views: 5
  • Event Viewer_Log Screenshot.PNG
    Event Viewer_Log Screenshot.PNG
    543.7 KB · Views: 5
Last edited:
Top